Skip to main content

Full text of "Long Lance"

See other formats


THE    MAKING    OF   A    "BRAVE

mother5 when alone with her like this, will never
leave my memory.

As we awakened more fully and our ears grew
accustomed to more distant sounds, we would find
that the whole camp was a bedlam of noise. From
every teepee came the rhythmic chant of a medi-
cine song. In other teepees little groups had
already gathered around a tom-tom and were
beating It softly and singing as the camp was
preparing for the early morning breakfast.

And through all this noise would come to us the
occasional gruff, deep-chested announcements of
the 'camp crier' as he made the round of the camp,
crying out orders from the chief and the tribal
medicine-man.

About half an hour before noon we would
hear a big commotion, and then we would see
twelve young warriors racing Into the camp on
horseback, dragging behind them the freshly cut
evergreens which would be thrown over the
skeleton of the Sun Dance lodge at a given signal
from the medicine-man. And a little later two
women, dressed in a special regalia, would come
galloping into camp with an eagle's nest, which
would be placed at the top of the Sun Dance pole.

At high noon, just as the sun arrived directly
overhead, the medicine-man would give the signal
for the erection of the lodge.

That was the signal for the cut-loose.    Never

149